Crossing Over

The Boy finally crossed over to his new Boy Scout troop this past weekend. I say “finally” because he’s been caught in that weird world between Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts that is known as Webelos. It’s a fine line to walk, being a Webelos Den Leader. You have to give them more responsibility and do more — especially more outdoors — with them, but you can’t take them as far as Boy Scouts. And the Webelos program is entirely too long at 18-ish months. I think starting them at Tigers Cubs (now “Tigers,” sans “Cubs”) may make Cubs too long, but we have to get to them before sports gets them too deep and their families think they’re too busy to add Scouting, too. Like I said, it’s a fine line. Maybe the Cub Scout program revamp coming in 2015 will fix some of that. I think it’ll help. But, for us, it’ll be mostly academic, as we’ll be deep in Boy Scouting by then.

The Boy did a good job of choosing his troop. Watching him hanging out with their older Scouts after the Crossover ceremony on Saturday night, I could already see how well he fits in with them. And I like the adult leaders, too. Some are from our old Pack, and some are new faces. All are great guys and leaders. I’ve been asked to be an Assistant Scoutmaster and accepted. Looking forward to figuring out my path to serving the boys of our new troop.

Map and Compass

The Boy earned his compass for hiking 75 miles with our Pack in the fall, so I wanted to get him a book on map and compass skills for Christmas so he could be learning the basics. I ended up getting him Basic Illustrated Map and Compass by Cliff Jacobson. The book is a solid introduction to map and compass reading and includes a short chapter on GPS, as well.

I read it in a couple of sittings, and I enjoyed the refresher course (not having had to use my map and compass skills much in the last few years). I wanted a book that was short and concise, and I trust Cliff’s advice. I enjoy his no-nonsense, “here’s what’s worked for me for the last 30 years” type of writing. His Expedition Canoeing is the bible of wilderness canoeing, and he’s working on a new edition of it for publication in 2015. His Basic Illustrated Cooking in the Outdoors is the book I recommend to new outdoors cooks, too.

The Boy will be learning map and compass skills on outings as he gets active with his new Boy Scout Troop starting on March 1st (our Webelos Crossover date). While he now has Cliff’s book and the Boy Scout Handbook, The Boy really thrives on learning by doing (“experiential education,” is the technical term), and he’s going to absorb most of this while doing it in the field instead of reading a book. But, books are still good for background and context.

The 10 Essentials Updated

The point of the Ten Essentials list (developed by The Mountaineers, with origins in the climbing course taught by the Club since the 1930s) has always been to help answer two basic questions: First, can you respond positively to an accident or emergency? Second, can you safely spend a night—or more—out?

There are plenty of other versions of the 10 Essentials, ranging from the Boy Scouts of America (the one I’m most familiar with) to the new, updated “system”-based version put out by The Mountaineers.

Ten Essentials: The Classic List

  1. Map
  2. Compass
  3. Sunglasses and sunscreen
  4. Extra clothing
  5. Headlamp/flashlight
  6. First-aid supplies
  7. Firestarter
  8. Matches
  9. Knife
  10. Extra food

Ten Essential Systems

  1. Navigation (map & compass)
  2. Sun protection (sunglasses & sunscreen)
  3. Insulation (extra clothing)
  4. Illumination (headlamp/flashlight)
  5. First-aid supplies
  6. Fire (waterproof matches/lighter/candle)
  7. Repair kit and tools
  8. Nutrition (extra food)
  9. Hydration (extra water)
  10. Emergency shelter (tent/plastic tube tent/garbage bag)

Several of the items in the classic list are combined in the new system list. Logically, map and compass have been united under “navigation,” as have firestarter and matches. I think it’s interesting that the new list doesn’t explicitly include a knife, something I consider essential when traveling in the outdoors, but if you read the annotation on the article about the 10 essential systems on The Mountaineers’ website, they include a knife under “repair kit and tools.” A knife is – of course – a tool.

I read somewhere I can’t remember about the shift from Boy Scouts carrying a traditional Boy Scout Pocket Knife (with can opener and awl) to carrying a multitool, since it fits contemporary Scouts’ gear better. It was an insightful observation. Still, I carry a dedicated knife (a – gasp! – sheath knife, even!) and usually have a multi-tool on me, a well.

Webelos Crossover resources

The Boy’s Webelos den is in its last few months, and we’ve spent a lot of time over the last month visiting troop meetings and camping out with troops as the Webelos start making their decisions about which troop to join. We have four Boy Scout troops in our area, and we’ve sent boys to all four in the last few years. As Assistant Cubmaster this year, my primary job has been to promote Webelos-Troop relations and encourage Webelos to participate in activities with troops.

I’ve found a number of resources on the web lately that have helped us with that transition program.

Scoutmaster Jerry’s post about finding the adventure on the Scoutmaster Minute blog is mostly “just” inspirational. I admire his efforts to help Webelos find the right troop for them even — especially — when it’s not his troop.

Scout Circle for November 2013 was about Webelos crossover issues. Clarke Green talked about a number of things I found useful (as is usually the case with Clarke!). His new book, The Scouter’s Journey, is available from his site at scoutmastercg.com, which is full of great Scouting ideas.

Frank Maynard’s blog Bobwhite Blather has several excellent posts about the Webelos-to-Boy-Scouts transition here. Frank’s blog is pointed mainly at Troop Committee members, but it’s useful for all Scouters.

Beginning Boy Scouts is a small book available on Amazon that looks like a great resource for new Boy Scout parents.

Daniel’s first Cub Scout badge

Tonight was the Pack 46 Pack meeting, and Daniel received the first badge he’s earned: his Bobcat. He is very proud of himself, and we’re proud of the work he did to earn it. He also earned his Collecting and Languages and Cultures belt loops. Hallie taught the Tigers a short German lesson at the last den meeting to help them get that belt loop.

Daniel also got a hiking patch for going on his first hike with the pack last weekend. He’ll get a special patch after he’s hiked 25 miles, and at 50 miles they’re presented with a hiking stick. He REALLY wants that stick! And he loves hiking, so I’ll bet he gets it sooner rather than later.