The 10 Essentials Updated

The point of the Ten Essentials list (developed by The Mountaineers, with origins in the climbing course taught by the Club since the 1930s) has always been to help answer two basic questions: First, can you respond positively to an accident or emergency? Second, can you safely spend a night—or more—out?

There are plenty of other versions of the 10 Essentials, ranging from the Boy Scouts of America (the one I’m most familiar with) to the new, updated “system”-based version put out by The Mountaineers.

Ten Essentials: The Classic List

  1. Map
  2. Compass
  3. Sunglasses and sunscreen
  4. Extra clothing
  5. Headlamp/flashlight
  6. First-aid supplies
  7. Firestarter
  8. Matches
  9. Knife
  10. Extra food

Ten Essential Systems

  1. Navigation (map & compass)
  2. Sun protection (sunglasses & sunscreen)
  3. Insulation (extra clothing)
  4. Illumination (headlamp/flashlight)
  5. First-aid supplies
  6. Fire (waterproof matches/lighter/candle)
  7. Repair kit and tools
  8. Nutrition (extra food)
  9. Hydration (extra water)
  10. Emergency shelter (tent/plastic tube tent/garbage bag)

Several of the items in the classic list are combined in the new system list. Logically, map and compass have been united under “navigation,” as have firestarter and matches. I think it’s interesting that the new list doesn’t explicitly include a knife, something I consider essential when traveling in the outdoors, but if you read the annotation on the article about the 10 essential systems on The Mountaineers’ website, they include a knife under “repair kit and tools.” A knife is – of course – a tool.

I read somewhere I can’t remember about the shift from Boy Scouts carrying a traditional Boy Scout Pocket Knife (with can opener and awl) to carrying a multitool, since it fits contemporary Scouts’ gear better. It was an insightful observation. Still, I carry a dedicated knife (a – gasp! – sheath knife, even!) and usually have a multi-tool on me, a well.